SYLLABUS for LSP COURSES (1 – 4)

ESP COURSES (1 – 4)

Institute: Department of Foreign Languages, Faculty of Arts, Comenius University in Bratislava

Level: minimal starting level B1

Course length: 112 teaching hours (4 semesters)

GENERAL OBJECTIVES

The main objective of ESP courses is to acquire universal language competence with respect to specific academic and professional context. The main focus is on communicative language competences in the field of social sciences and humanities important for study, professional growth and students mobility at university level.

The level of acquired language competences will enable students to:

a) gain subject-oriented data and information from foreign sources written in English (scholarly books and journals, electronic media, etc.),

b) develop subject specific knowledge on the basis of reading texts,

c) enable to produce professionally-oriented texts in written and spoken discourse,

d) build communication competences needed for presenting project results,

e) develop pragmatic study competences needed for study at university level, as well as  for potential university study abroad,

f) acquire the strategies of life-long learning and continual professional growth,

g) raise empathy and tolerance to intercultural differences.

The programme is based on the development of students’ communicative language competences using task- and text-based approach. To acquire this, students have to be involved in language activities and be prepared to master communicative strategies. With respect to individualization of the learning process a modified teacher-learner relationship is expected, and this situation requires involvement of students’ greater activity and individual work. That is why different strategies of autonomous learning are incorporated.

The ESP texts represent different styles in social sciences and humanities, thus students are acquainted with typical features of academic and field-specific styles both in written and spoken discourse.

The content of individual ESP courses is adapted to the specific study programmes.

The four-semester course finishes with a final examination consisting of two parts – written and oral. The student submits a written structured project  from his field of study and presents it at a simulated conference which also includes a discussion. 

SPECIFIC GOALS

1st year

The proficiency level of secondary school graduates is commonly at B1 (B1+) level of the CEFR. After the two semesters of specialized foreign language instruction (ESP1 and ESP2) they regularly advance to a higher level[1]. ESP1 and ESP2 enable students to:

  • identify and create academic definitions (simple and expanded),
  • critically analyze and interpret field-specific texts,
  • determine main ideas and supporting details,
  • write listing paragraphs,
  • write comparison and contrast texts,
  • write cause and effect texts,
  • identify signal words and their functions in the field-specific texts,
  • paraphrase texts,
  • summarize texts,
  • express personal opinions and give supporting points.

2nd year

The two semesters of specialized foreign language instruction (ESP3 and ESP4) help students advance to B2, B2+ or C1 levels[2]. ESP3 and ESP4 enable students to:

  • actively use subject-specific vocabulary
  • report what others say and refer to information sources,
  • acquire strategies for writing the paper of argumentation,
  • form questions in questionnaires and interviews,
  • transform graphic material into text and vice versa,
  • develop strategies of academic discussion,
  • learn methods in constructing and conducting survey,
  • write short academic texts (abstract, keywords, survey report),
  • acquire strategies of academic subject-oriented presentation.

RESOURCE MATERIALS:

WILLIAMS, J., BROWN, K., HOOD, S. Academic Encounters Level 3. Life in Society, Reading, Writing. Cambridge : CUP, 2012.
Ceramella, N., Lee, E. Cambridge English for the Media. Cambridge : CUP, 2013.
ESPESTH, M. 1999. Academic Encounters. Human Behaviour. Listening, Note Taking and Discussion. Cambridge : CUP, 1997.
GRUSSENDORF, M. English for Presentations. Plzeň : Fraus, 2008.
JORDAN, R. R.. Academic Writing Course. Study Skills in English. Longman, 2004.
McCARTHY, M. & O`DELL, F. Academic Vocabulary in Use. Cambridge : CUP, 2008.
OSHIMA, A., HOGUE, A. Writing Academic English. Longman, 1998.
PATERSON, K. English Grammar and Practice for Academic Purposes. Oxford : OUP, 2013.
PORTER, D. Check your Vocabulary for Academic English. 2008.
SANABRIA, K. Academic Encounters. Life in Society 3. Listening, Speaking. Cambridge : CUP, 2012.
SEAL, B. Academic Encounters. Human Behaviour. Reading, Study Skills, Writing. Cambridge : CUP, 2004.


[1] As the level of the language competence of secondary school graduates varies and the status of LSP at the faculty is not identical (LSP can be compulsory, elective or optional), the instruction and the syllabus are adjusted to the current level of students’ competences at each of the individual courses.

[2] As the level of the language competence of secondary school graduates varies and the status of LSP at the faculty is not identical (LSP can be compulsory, elective or optional), the instruction and the syllabus are adjusted to the current level of students’ competences at each of the individual courses.